Why Manifesting Works

Separateness is a delusion. Like the stars, the clouds, sea slugs and bathroom soap, you are a piece of the universe. That the matter and energy that you consider to be “you” is part of the matter and energy of the universe is beyond dispute.

Better yet, you are a thinking piece of the universe. To some extent self-aware, you are part of a conscious universe.

When you engage in the practice of manifesting what you want, you are not just asking a discreet, foreign agent to give you something — you are asking it of yourself:

You are asking for what you want from yourself.

If you think of it that way, it makes sense that you will give yourself what you want. Now, you may may be tempted to test the Law of Attraction, the construct that describes manifesting, by asking for a castle built of ice cream cones. But then you are not asking for a need to be fulfilled. The universe — you — wants to take care of your needs. You may only be the little toe of the body of the universe, but just as you want what’s best for your toe, the universe wants what’s best for you.

So when you decide to focus on something you really want, like connection, freedom, safety or happiness, know that the manifestation of your desires is not dependent on the whim of a detached being deciding your fate.

Instead, do the work to figure out what your true desires are. Ask your heart what you want. And if the first answer that comes up is a specific material object or person, delve deeper to uncover the need behind that desire. Then ask yourself — the larger universal you — to satisfy that desire.

You may find it useful to spend some time meditating on the phrase I am, to get a glimpse beyond the veil of illusory boundaries.

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OCD-Free

OCD-Free

Essays, stories & poetry about OCD, culture and society, by Eric